Guida Verde Michelin

Des table en bois ègayèes de fleurs des camps, où l'on se règale de jambon de San Daniele, d'agneau prè-salè, de lapins aux pignons et fenouil sauvage, le tout arrosè de vins de Frioul.

Baked Pleurotus Mushrooms

Pleurotus is a genus of gilled mushrooms which includes one of the most widely eaten mushrooms, Pleurotus ostreatus. Species of Pleurotus may be called oyster, abalone, or tree mushrooms, and are some of the most commonly cultivated edible mushrooms in the world. Pleurotus fungi …

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Creme Brule

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Creme brulèe, also known as burnt cream or trinity cream is a dessert consisting of a rich custard base topped with a contrasting layer of hard caramel. It is normally served cold.

The custard base is traditionally flavored with vanilla, but is also sometimes flavored with lemon or orange zest, rosemary, chocolate, coffee, liqueurs, green tea, pistachio, coconut or other fruit.

The exact origins are uncertain. The earliest known reference of creme brulèe as we know it today appears in Francois Massialot's 1691 cookbook, and the French name was used in the English translation of this book, but the 1731 edition of Massialot's Cuisinier roial et bourgeois changed the name of the same recipe from "crème brûlée" to "crème anglaise". In the early eighteenth century, the dessert was called "burnt cream" in English.

In Britain, a version of creme brulèe (known locally as 'Trinity Cream' or 'Cambridge burnt cream') was introduced at Trinity College, Cambridge in 1879 with the college arms "impressed on top of the cream with a branding iron". The story goes that the recipe was from an Aberdeenshire country house and was offered by an undergraduate to the college cook, who turned it down. However, when the student became a Fellow, he managed to convince the cook.